Azalea satsuki question

Got this azalea 2 days ago, from Portugal. It spent one week in a box but arrived, IMO, in good shape.
2 days later it seens to have yellowed quite a lot, compared to how it was upon delivery.
Am I just paranoid? Or is there any reason for concern?
I have a few others but none have yellowed so much and never really had any problems with them. So I am a bit worried.
I keep it in a greenhouse, 2-5 celsius(35-41f), soil is wet but not soaked, there is pleny of light as the ghouse is in the south side of the garden.
First pic is from when it arrived, second and 3’rd pics from today(2 days after arrival).
Thank you.

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The tips appear to be green and only the older, interior leaves seems to be abscissing. It’s probably a little stressed from the relocation and will be acclimating. I think it will be fine, just make sure to reduce your watering according to the needs of the tree. Very nice specimen you have there! Bonsai on!

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I agree with Nathen. Satsukis lose leaves when the temperature drops in winter. Depending on the variety, it can be from a few to 90%. As I said, each variety reacts individually.

I have dozens of azaleas for more than 5 years. It has been confirmed in my experience the following statement: As long as the buds are healthy and firmly attached to the branch, there is no immediate danger to the satsuki.

As long as the leaves color in a “normal” way, the reason is usually not a health problem.

If the leaves do not color evenly, or there are spots, dots, etc., you should check more closely.

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Ok, thank you both(unsure how to tag you).
I’ll leave it be, nothing else seems wrong with it.

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|hi Dan, it is just going through normal winter behaviour. The summer leaves turn yellow and drop off but you will be left with winter resting leaves around the flower buds and tips of branches. Then next spring it will leaf out again. It’s the way a satsuki saves energy during the winter. Incidentally if you wish to propagate cuttings use the fast growing shoots (sprouts) when they reach about 3 inch (65mm) as they make better trees in the long term.

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