Storm with derecho winds

So we had 80 to 90 mph winds yesterday. Guess this is one good reason to tie down trees! Ensuring trees are secure in their pots is obvious in this weather!


The twin trunk Thuja was blown over, the tree and soil stayed intact! Bamboo strips holding the soil was a big factor in saving the tree. Douglas fir in the bonsai structure was not moved at all. Building the structure to withstand wind yet allowing airflow probably saved it. There were many solid cedar fences that were blown down. The hemlock was blown over and the granite slab it was on was knocked off a concrete stand. No damage to roots but soil was disrupted on the surface only. Not sure if roots are ok. Th itoigawa juniper was knocked off a table with little disruption to the soil, so hope it will survive. I have a colorado blue spruce that was on a metal stand on the deck. IT DID NOT MOVE AT ALL. Good heavy pot with heavy rain seemed to anchor it! roots from the zelkova in the colander seem intact. Need to put them in the ground or into individual containers. :thinking: LandscapePine with new deadwood

2 Likes

Phew, glad the damage looks fairly minimal.

1 Like

Wow, that was crazy. I am impressed and surprised you had so little damage!

1 Like

this is heart breaking. I had a tree blown off the bench in the spring after thinking that it would be OK and of course, the pot cracked. Now, everything is tied down with nylon cord and these slick little hooks that look with a cord lock built in.
That and bungee cords.
I hope that the trees are OK.

1 Like

Oh no!! Hope nothing was too damaged and that everyone is okay.

1 Like

Sorry to hear you had damage to your trees. What part of the country is this?

1 Like

His profile says Central Iowa.
Big wind country!

1 Like

Here’s a photo of the hook / cord cam lock that I got from Home Depot. Since the cam lock mechanism is built into the hook, it is easy to snug down but also very easy to remove to reposition the tree without having to re-thread the lines through the bench. Not very pretty but very functional
image

1 Like

Great idea Les!
I built the slatted wall shelter to protect during storms, but allow enough air flow in regular daytime and nighttime weather. I stole the idea from the Portland Japanese garden images and videos. Mine is functional but not as attractive as the finished wood slats. My prior shelter was made of 8 foot cedar fencing with little air flow. Great to protect during a big blow, but did not allow enough air flow to avoid fungus developing and spreading in my pines and spruce and common junipers. The trees on the leeward and windward sides of the slatted wall are all fine! The trees placed out of the shade in the yard were not well protected and those were the ones who suffered. Probably will build some monkey poles in the sunny areas and use the cam locks or regular clothes line to secure them!

sounds very appropriate.

1 Like