Need some advice on how to handle willow cuttings

Willow cutting novice here, any and all advice is appreciated.

I’d heard willow cuttings root really easy, so when I was looking for a bonsai project to keep me distracted over the winter, I went to the park, took a cutting off a branch and cut that up into about 5 starters. All but one is rooting like crazy after just a couple of weeks. (The one that isn’t rooting was mistakenly placed upside down. Lesson learned.)

The initial roots have grown 1 to 2 inches long on most of the cuttings (seen at the bottom on the left of the two cuttings in the picture). They are just starting to push out some leaf growth, but nothing has fully extended or hardened off yet. How long do I wait before I pot them in soil? Should I wait until the leafs grow out, or until the roots grow longer, or wait until spring when I move them outside?

Also, I noticed that most of them have just grown roots out of one side. If I wait longer, will more roots grow from other areas? I see that there are more root buds (is that the right term) that haven’t grown out yet, but I’m not sure if they will now that these other roots have grown this long.

Thanks in advance.

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Hey Tac, you are fine to put cuttings straight into the soil. Cold frame/green house is needed for this.
Check out the stream on cuttings in the library where it is recommended to put cuttings in perlite. Sorry I can’t remember exact name of the stream but shouldn’t be difficult to look it up.

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Propagation primer is the name :slight_smile:

I agree with CoffeeCherry, your safe to pot them up now. You can use perlite or small particle pumice. As with all cuttings the roots are fragile and will need tying into the pot. Remember willow loves water and often in the wild (in the UK at least) are found with roots in ponds and rivers. Hope this helps…

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