Locating an Anderson Flat?

Hello everyone. I’m looking to purchase an Anderson flat for some field growing material, every place I’ve found some, I have to buy 75 of them. I don’t need that many nor would I like to spend that much money. Would a grow box be a good replacement? I would still like to bury the container in the ground either way.

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What kind of grow box? One you construct yourself? What kind of material?

In my experience, an Anderson Flat isn’t really used for planting in the ground, but leaving on top of the ground. The roots can escape from the fine mesh bottom, and the plastic is UV resistant. If you want to plant something in the ground, felt root control bags are another option and findable on Amazon.

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You can purchase Anderson flats individually here: https://www.stuewe.com/products/anderson.php
But shipping is still very expensive depending on where you are.

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Thanks @nmhansen. A grow box that I could build within some screws and boards. I don’t really know too much about either or, I just wanted to plant a tree in the ground without it it being too big of a hassle digging it up 2-3 years later. I think a grow bag is the way I was thinking. I still would like to get an Anderson Flat. My goal was to grow 3 of the same species in different ways. One in the ground, one on some gravel in the nursery pot and the third in the Anderson flat. I was confused on the proper use of the Anderson flat… I appreciate your help finding the Anderson flat @Atlarsenal

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Just put in my order! Thanks again!

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I can suggest ponds baskets, in lew of making grow boxes or sourcing Anderson flats. They cost $1.50-2.50 per and last years plus they are made to withstand the elements and provide a lot of aeration to your roots. I place them directly on top of my mulch beds for growing. I pull up every 2 - 3 years, rework the roots to prevent flaws. I get rapid growth, thickening and healing of my trees in this manner. Been doing this for about 10 years now. Better than digging holes through slabs of limestone in central Texas. Pics to show. Also, I place terra cotta containers on ground and let roots escape in same manner. !

15659735519826976241103245743768|375x500

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I actually just bought three pond baskets to use with some little saplings I’m gonna dig up this weekend. I liked the idea of Anderson flats as well, but not being able to find them locally or online with reasonable shipping led me to the pond baskets. If/when I have larger trees that require a flat I’ll probably just build a grow box. I’ve thought about just building the sides and then lining the bottom with mesh much like an Anderson flat.

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Yes I’ve not been able to find a way to source them for a reasonable price as well. Primary reason I use pond baskets. I dont have the desire to make grow boxes, but they would work really well in the manner you spoke of. I like to spend my money on the containers/vessels when they start refinement.

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Lots of construction in my neighborhood, so I’ve been able to use scrap pieces of 2x6. My biggest hesitation with building boxes is the dang table saw. I swear that thing is starving and it only feeds upon fingers. :confused:

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The leader has grown about 8-10 ft this year and all the side branches are kept short to keep them usable. I cut the leader back in early March as a directional prune and it was about 4ft long at the time. The leader is currently being used to heal a large pruning scar and to transition in the taper to the apex.

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Haha that is so true! Nice to have free scrap lumber. Build with caution!

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@ndavila80 I’m going to get some ponds baskets as well. This looks like exactly the route I want to go in. Did you initially slip pot them into the basket or did you do a full transplant with some root work in the spring? Thanks everyone for all y’alls help.

Hey @ndavila80, what kind of tree is this? I found some sapplings that look similar to it.

I did a full transplant at initial placement in pond baskets. Let sit on ground and let roots escape. Every year or two I lift off ground and severe the escape roots. I rework every 2-3 years the roots in baskets, I also plant the nebari about 2 inches deep.

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Native Texas cedar elm. This is one I pulled from the green space behind the house.

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The pond basket ideas is actually pretty good, and depending on your area, everything from pet stores to big box stores will carry them.

Completely off topic, but @ndavila80, what’s your experience with those bottle brush? Seen some really nice ones in my area and thinking of getting some to style like conifers.

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I like them, I treat them similar to a confier and thats how is responded best. Initially I would prune and leave foilage. And it would take forever before I would see growth and it was very coarse, a pruning practice I performed for 3 years. Then at beginning of last year I began letting it grow really long and would cut back leaving a minimum of 2 and usually 3 or 4 elongating secondary or teriarty branches. I dont prune growing tips, I prune only when there is ramification present. I cut back to the laterals, may do that 3-4 times a year. This has really been the fruitful in getting the foilage to compact.

It probably also helps that it’s been in that container for 4 years now. It needs repotting soon and I can tell in that this year I’ve only performed 1 pruning and the new growth is very compact, dense and fine. This is good in refinement but I want more growth in the trunk so in the spring I’m going to repot.

Its initiall potting was in summer and it did great despite how aggressive I was on the roots. I believe it can tolerate spring and summer root work given it has enough foilage. Its in 1 part akadama and 2 part lava mixture right now, I’m sure it can be placed in any 1/3 to 1/2 akadama based or similar mix.

Its heat tolerant and drought tolerant and even in + 100°F weather will contine to thrive. Its cold tolerant to about 20° F with no problem. It can tolerate a wide range of pH as I use tap water in summer due to the lack of rain and the water is alkaline. I check soil pH and it has been 7.8 and growing well for 3 years. This year I added a KDF/GAC filter to my water supply and the soil ph is 7. It appears the plant has not noticed as its been happy the whole time. Well happier once I figured the pruning out.This one has really nice magenta to red flowers as well. The wood is soft and deadwood doesn’t last even when treated. It rots really fast.

Overall I like it, its sturdy, its evergreen, it flowers.

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So prune back to only other growing tips. The local library has some soda can sized trunks on a few of these in full sun, which made me interested in them. I’ve been looking for a large one, since they seem slow growing. I’ll touch base with you again when I finally find one I like.

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I feel like they grow pretty well with proper water, fertilizer and pruning. The trunk on this has thickened quite well since early last year. It was sparse and now its filled out well and the trunk has doubled since its initial potting. Next year I’m going to place it in a 14" terra cotta container or pond basket and let it run. Will be interesting to see how much growth it can put on if I can keep my hands off. I’ll update on it later.

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Google “Geopot” they have a short type called Squat Pot in different sizes

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