Vascular Tissue

I heard repeatedly about the creation of vascular tissue in our trees. Are they forming this tissue all year round or just a certain time of the year? I thought I heard Ryan say in the fall?

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Good question @Cjlopez4,
My take would be it will depend on the species, and where you are. For example, a ficus in the tropics may not conform.
Generally speaking though, trees invest energy in creating leaves in the spring and in the fall they prepare for the winter and following spring by storing energy, which may lead to increased growth in vascular tissue.
If you wire in the spring and it starts blighting in by summer, it is due to growth in vascular tissue, so it’s not restricted to the fall, but may be more prominent?

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Fall is the season dedicated to vascular tissue creation. This is by storing energy for Spring. Some plants store it in the roots, some in the trunk/branches, etc.

This does not mean vascular tissue isn’t being created at other times. Just as leaves/needles can be growing in almost all 4 seasons (broadleaf evergreens and coniferous trees) so can vascular tissue.

I would say that vascular tissue is created in these seasons from most to least:

Fall > Spring > Summer/Winter (depending on which is more mild for you. This is due to very hot Summers will shut down growth as very cold Winters do. My Winter is very mild but we have super hot Summers, so it’d be Fall > Spring > Winter > Summer for me.)

It is true however that broadleaf evergreens, tropical, and evergreens/conifers all produce vascular tissue and even foliage year round. They move less water and therefore (correct me if I’m wrong here…) don’t create as much vascular tissue in Fall or as much foliage in Spring as a deciduous tree which moves water and energy much faster. Deciduous trees however don’t create the vascular tissue or foliage that the others do in Winter and Summer due to lower high heat tolerance (foliage loses more water through transpiration/evaporation) and lose their leaves in Winter.

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When we cut a tree through the trunk, are we saying that the pale large rings are put down in the autumn? When are the thin dark rings put down?

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@AndyK This is a pretty in depth break down of tree ring formation. The illustration is a Scots Pine too which I think is kinda cool. Anyways, I hope it helps!

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Thanks @Carl,
Mind, blown! :grin:

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